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LYME 101

How?

Blacklegged Tick
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Ticks can attach to any part of the human body but are often found in hard-to-see areas such as the groin, armpits, and scalp. In most cases, the tick must be attached for 36 to 48 hours or more before the Lyme disease bacterium can be transmitted.

Most humans are infected through the bites of immature ticks called nymphs. Nymphs are approximately the size of a poppy seed and difficult to see.

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U.S. Dime

Larva 

Nymph 

Adult

Where?

Tickborne diseases have been reported in all 48 contiguous states and Alaska, though the majority are focused in the Northeast and Midwest, with 14 states accounting for over 85% of cases.

Western Black-Legged Tick

Ixodes Pacificus

Deer Tick / Black-Legged Tick

Ixodes Pacificus

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Lyme Smarts Children are at the highest risk of acquiring Lyme disease. Studies show significant IQ drops in students with Lyme, but IQ’s do go back up after treatment. 25% of new Lyme disease cases each year are children.

When?

Eggs hatch in the spring.

Larva feed on small mammals,

lizards and birds. 

Nymphs feed on humans. 

Spring

Summer 

Fall

Adult ticks feed on

medium to large animals and humans.

Tick activity diminishes during colder months. However, adult ticks can become active on warmer Winter days.

Winter

Winter is a good time to get tested for Lyme disease when testing for influenza, COVID-19 and other illnesses with similar

symptoms.  

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Symptoms

Early Signs

Swollen Lymph Nodes

Fatigue 

Joint & Muscle Aches

Sweats

Bulls Eye Rash 

Chills 

Headaches

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